Category Archives: bulbs

Happy Daffodil Campaign – Part 2

One beautiful sunny day, way back in June 1990, I went hatless at the bicentennial celebrations around Sooke Harbour.  I was having a blast.  The activity & cooling sea breeze distracted me from the danger.  As an adult, I knew better, but… gosh, I got scorched!

Susie Seekins Mt. Tolmie Garden Care Victoria
SVSeekins

By that evening, the tops of my ears were bright red & tender.
Even the top of my head, where my hair was parted, sunburned.

Time to act more like a grown-up!

I’ve been a hat kinda girl since.

That was 30 years ago!  I’ve been so good for decades.

my left ear, stitches removed.
phot by CD Miller

Recently, the dermatologist agreed with my concern over an odd spot on the outer ridge of my left ear.  A small biopsy determined it was basal cell carcinoma (BCC).  Treatable.  A quick visit with a plastic surgeon removed a larger section along the ear helix, to be sure all of the cancer was taken.

This is me practicing caution & assertiveness.  Awhile back, I  learned the most common spot for women to get skin cancer is on the ankle (See: My Happy Daffodil Campaign – Pt. 1).  Now I’m happy I paid attention to this little spot, too.

Today’s lessons:

  • BCC occurs most often on skin that’s suffered serious sunburns – even if those burns happened way back in childhood.

    my left ear, stitches removed.
    photo by CD Miller
  • This is the most common spot for men to get skin cancer. I guess a baseball cap might shade the face, but does diddly for protecting the ears.

Ageing has also presented me with dry, flakey skin on the back of my hands.  I learned it’s from long past sun exposure, too.  It’s called actinic keratoses  – NOT cancer.  But it is a precursor to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).
Who knew there were so many kinds of skin cancer?

Susie Seekins Mt. Tolmie Garden Care Victoria
photo by A Fox

Whenever my specialist becomes concerned about one of my spots of actinic keratoses, he zaps it with liquid nitrogen.  It’s a simple treatment. I gotta like simple remedies… especially to avoid the alternative.

The other day the ear surgery results came back – I learned that for this surgery, all cancer was removed successfully.
🙂
It is lovely to ‘Live & Learn.’

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BCCancer Agency – non-Melanoma types

Summit Park Crocus Meadow

Time & patience is a beautiful thing.

photo by SVSeekins

Well over a century ago, someone planted crocus in a garden at  Hillside Farm.  In the late 1880’s much of the farm became a subdivision. Then, 90 years after that, the original home site became Summit Park.  Even though the gardens are no longer there, the crocuses are.  They’ve survived & naturalized in the Garry Oak meadow.

snow crocus, woodland crocus, early crocus, summit park, crocus, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC Pacific Northwestsummit park, crocus, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

It delights me to see the tiny blooms peeking out of the grass as the sun shines down on them.  Crocus isn’t as showy as the native fawn lily & camas that bloom here in April & May, but their energy is exuberant.  In February, I need this excitement.

summit park, crocus, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

Snow Crocus (Crocus tommasinianus) is reputed as the best of the 90 Crocus species for naturalizing.  A decade ago, I planted bags & bags of mixed snow crocus in a patch of lawn outside our home. It’s doing okay, but not up to Summit Park’s showing.  I wonder if the Hillside homesteader had access to bags of bulbs way back then… Perhaps, s/he ordered catalogue seed?

summit park, crocus, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

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Here are some other meadows:

 

Fernwood Snowdrop Meadow

How often do you stop mid-errand to admire a roadside garden?   I did just that the other day.

galanthus, snowdrops, garden Victoria BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

Cycling along Haultain in Fernwood, on the way to downtown Victoria, I’m caught off guard by a snowdrop meadow.  I pull over & take a closer look.

The meadow runs the whole outside length of the fenceline.  AND as it is a corner lot, so it runs along  Forbes street, too!  There was even a mini meadow on the wee boulevard right at the crosswalk. 🙂

galanthus, snowdrops, garden Victoria BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

The patches of snowdrops are interspersed with patches of daffodils.  This winter meadow will morph into an early-spring meadow in another few weeks.

On closer inspection, I recognize Calendula (Pot Marigold), too.  Even with our summer droughts, they’ll flower all summer & well into the fall!

galanthus, snowdrops, garden Victoria BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

All three are deer resistant.

The calendula will self-seed a crop for next year as well as feed the birds.

These folks put care & attention into the city boulevard beside their property.  (Can you see him painting his fence in the distance?)

In my mind, this meadow has so much more going for it than the regular grass lawn.  I’ll bet the bees & other beneficial insects like it a whole lot more, too.

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other snowdrop patches I admire: