Tag Archives: Enerfab Carpentry

Building A Privacy Trellis

Clematis montana on fence, mountain clematis, Himalayan clematis , garden Victoria BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

When we first moved to our corner lot, it was surrounded by a rickety fence hosting a pretty, spring-blooming clematis. I liked the clematis, but the fence was on borrowed time. As traffic came down the hill and around the curve, drivers could see right into our yard. We wanted more privacy than the fence could give. A trellis would obscure drivers’ views, provide the vine with a better opportunity to climb, AND snaz up the garden with a bit of Architectural Detail. ūüôā

build a privacy trellis, garden Victoria BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

After the fence demolition, C dug 2 precisely spaced foundation holes. Two 4 foot long pieces of 2×2 angle iron were drilled for lug bolts and painted with primer against rusting. Instead of setting wooden posts straight into the ground, the angle iron supports were concreted into the holes instead. The posts bolt onto the supports about 6 inches above soil level. This structure won’t collapse in a few years because the posts rot out!

A beam spans the posts with an extra overhang on either side. Two corner supports beef up stability & increase the load the trellis can carry. Rafters and purlins top the beam.

build a privacy trellis, garden Victoria BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins
build a privacy trellis, garden Victoria BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

After that, the lattice was built & installed. The vine now has lots of opportunities to spread out, scramble & climb. The yard is not nearly as exposed. There’s a feeling of privacy without the claustrophobia of hiding behind a fortress. I like it.

I reckon the Clematis montana likes it, too. The roots nestle into the moist soil on the north side of the trellis, yet the vine basks in the sunshine.

build a privacy trellis, Cematis montana, garden Victoria BC Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

Hooray for the carpenter! Happy plants – happy gardener.

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Grape Trellis

The grape-vine was a delightful bonus for us when we first moved to the Richmond house. ¬†By summer, it would look so exotic & lush. ¬†Granted, its position was precarious as it was planted tight against the far right corner foundation of the carport – – the carport we’d marked for demolition.

the car port (grape far right)
photo by SVSeekins

We needed a garage.  We hoped to keep the grape-vine.

We kept the foundation.  The grape survived the big build.

grape vine survives the garage build (grape far right)
photo by SVSeekins

It even flourished when C set about growing tomatoes.  Roots had made their way into the tomato bed. The grape-vine appreciated the regular fertilizer & watering.

tomato bed spring 2007
photo by SVSeekins

Then last spring, we decided to extend the garage & add a new floor above.

Again, there would be massive demolition.

We’d try to save the grape from the perils of the construction.

grape vine spring 2011
photo by SVSeekins

vine on fence / woodshed roof
photo by SVSeekins

This entailed delicately removing the vine from the building and laying it on the rooftop of the fence / woodshed … before the garage was torn down & rebuilt.

I worried about the grape-vine baking on the asphalt shingles through the hot summer.  I worried about it being inadvertently damaged during the demolition, framing & stucco phases of construction.  I worried that it would be blown away during the wicked winter winds.

This spring, we rushed to put the vine back in place while the grape was still in its winter dormancy.

A beam was attached to the wall of the garage with careful attention to protecting the stucco & rain-screen integrity.

placing the first beam
photo by SVSeekins

Posts were secured to the rock wall of the tomato bed.  A 2nd beam spanned the posts.

the 2nd beam
photo by SVSeekins

Crossbeams were trimmed to size to hold the 2 longer beams parallel.

the short cross beams
photo by SVSeekins

Adding more side beams brought a recognizable shape into form.

the trellis develops
photo by SVSeekins

The grape-vine was delicately maneuvered into it’s upgraded position just in time for spring buds.

re-positioning the grapevine
photo by SVSeekins

Now fingers are crossed in hopes the grape-vine has survived & will provide exotic lushness to the courtyard again this summer.

Enerfab Carpentry did a pretty nice job, don’t you think?

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© copyright 2012 SVSeekins

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